Pennsylvania Volunteers

Train Together, Respond Together, Support Together

News Articles

October 30, 2019 - Flooding workshop promotes readiness


October 14, 2019 - GET PREPARED 2 flood-disaster workshops slated


July 5, 2017 - Emergency volunteers sought


July 3, 2017 - Volunteers look to get community prepared

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Pennsylvania Volunteers in the News

October 21, 2019

Slippery Rock University partners with the Pennsylvania Volunteers Inc.

to give students hands-on training

and real-world experience in emergency response


(Slippery Rock, PA) – Slippery Rock University’s Department of Homeland and Corporate Security Studies has partnered with the Pennsylvania Volunteers Inc., a Butler-based 501(c)(3) charitable organization supporting first responders, to give majors comprehensive, real-world training in emergency management and support of first responders. Students in the major will have the opportunity to be integrated with the PA Volunteers’ organization and gain hands-on experience in the field of disaster response. The PA Volunteers will provide training to students in the areas of shelter management, community emergency response team (CERT) certification, medical points of dispensing (PODs), and other aspects of community preparedness.


SRU offers Bachelor of Science degrees in homeland security and corporate security. The students will take the hands-on training progressively throughout their academic career at SRU and will culminate with active involvement as volunteers with the organization during the first semester of their junior year. Following the training phase, students will be eligible to take part in interagency exercises, multijurisdictional training sessions, and be given the opportunity to network with representatives from emergency management agencies that are active throughout the state and federally.


This partnership between the PA Volunteers and the SRU will also serve to provide additional career and resume-building opportunities for students interested in careers in security and emergency management.

“The members of PA Volunteers are excited about this opportunity,” said Rich Wilson, co-founder and vice president/volunteer coordinator for the organization. “We fully support SRU’s efforts to develop security-related professionals who are committed to helping first responders and volunteering in their communities.”


Jordan Guido, SRU of homeland and corporate security studies, will serve as the coordinator for the program. Guido, an SRU graduate, previously worked as the emergency management coordinator for the city of Fort Myers, Florida. She also developed the emergency management program for the city of Port Orange, Florida, prior to joining SRU. “As an SRU graduate, I am thrilled to be able to give students the opportunity to pair their degree with real-world field experience so that they will have a greater competitive advantage whenever they enter the professional career phase of their lives.”


About Pennsylvania Volunteers

The Pennsylvania Volunteers Inc. is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization based in Butler County, PA, with a mission to harness the power of every individual through education, training, and volunteer service to make communities safer, stronger, and better prepared to respond to the threats of terrorism, crime, public health issues, and disasters of all kinds. The Pennsylvania Volunteers have a Memorandum of Understanding with the County of Butler Emergency Services and also work very closely with various Commonwealth of Pennsylvania agencies, as well as the Federal government. For information about PA Volunteers, please visit www.pavolunteers.org, and follow @pavolunteers on Facebook.

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New county volunteer group to offer emergency support

Organization has about 50 members

Butler Eagle

Paula Grubbs Eagle Staff Writer

September 21, 2018 Local News


Steve Harding, Reinaldo Toro and Amy Wilson, members of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, train for disaster response with local Red Cross staff earlier this year.


A new county volunteer group will provide aid in local disasters so that police, firefighters, EMTs and other emergency responders can concentrate on the important job at hand.


Upon a recommendation by Steve Bicehouse, the county emergency services director, the county commissioners at their Wednesday meeting approved an agreement with the Pennsylvania Volunteers to provide ancillary services in the instance of a disaster.


While the volunteers, for example, would not enter a flooded house to rescue its occupants, they would set up shelter for those occupants or provide them with food or other necessities at the scene.


Bicehouse said in disasters like a flood, citizens often turn up offering to help out. While he appreciates their willingness to serve the community, Bicehouse said trained, vetted volunteers are needed.


“Unregistered volunteers happen with every disaster and can be quite a liability,” Bicehouse told the commissioners. “(The Pennsylvania Volunteers) have organized themselves and demonstrated that they are a viable organization that we can use in the event of a disaster.”

County commissioners were not unfamiliar with the group. Leslie Osche, commissioners chairman, witnessed the organization's members in action during a disaster drill at the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Station.


“They did a nice job,” Osche said.


She said it would be comforting to know trained professionals are serving as volunteers in a local disaster.


“It protects the volunteers and the victims,” Osche said.


Commissioner Kevin Boozel, who has a background in emergency services, attended one of the training sessions offered by the group out of curiosity.


“I find them to be very useful, especially for emergency services,” he said.


Boozel recommends that residents who want to have a hand in helping out during a community disaster join the Pennsylvania Volunteers and attend the free training sessions the group offers.


Bicehouse stressed that the services of the Pennsylvania Volunteers must be requested by the county emergency services department, and the group cannot deploy itself.


He said the county's individual municipalities would be the entities most often calling on the group for services when a disaster strikes.


Rich Wilson, vice president of volunteer operations for the Pennsylvania Volunteers, said the group provides traffic control, search and rescue dogs, shelter teams for those displaced by a disaster, damage assessment, disaster preparedness training, Community Emergency Response Team volunteers, disaster information materials for the blind and a host of other disaster support services.


“We are the trained volunteers,” Wilson said.


The group has about 50 members who meet at 6 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the American Legion Post 778 in Lyndora. A few are retired firefighters, policemen or pastors.


“But it can be anybody who's interested in helping and being part of the solution and not part of the problem,” Wilson said.


He said the meetings often include free training in various services the group provides, and members can pick and choose what they want to train in and how much time they spend on the group's work.


All members are required to get two government clearances and attend online training by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.


More information and membership applications are available at www.pavolunteers.org.